Greek

Ancient Greek Design in ETL

There are striking similarities between the first ETL collection and ancient Greek and Roman tunic designs. Here are the top three.

(1) Draped by Your Own Fair Hands:

Modern dress incorporates quite a bit of sewn structure. ETL garments are sewn, yes, but you have to drape the garments to finish the process. Just like the ancient Greeks! Of course, their choice was driven largely by necessity. Before such technology as the needle was widely used, cloth was used in an un-cut and un-sewn form, and tied around the body.

(Side note: Read this blog post about how stitched clothing was not prevalent in Southeast Asia until the 1500s)

Ancient:

Photo by  Nick van den Berg  on  Unsplash  (Note: not an ancient statute, but rather a modern interpretation of ancient dress)

Photo by Nick van den Berg on Unsplash (Note: not an ancient statute, but rather a modern interpretation of ancient dress)

ETL:



(2) Use of Gathering:

Gathering is the act of bringing more fabric than necessary together at a point. Gathering is done with stitches at the top of Athena with the Sashes, and in most modern sewing. The first ETL design, Athena with the Sashes, was inspired by depictions of the Greek goddess Athena, and traditional styles of Greek clothing. Gathering, in ancient times, was done with a … rope.

ETL:

Athena with the Sashes

Athena with the Sashes

Ancient:

Gathering is done with a belt rope, as seen in these depictions of Athena in the Parthenon replica in Nashville, Tennessee, and at the Temple of Athena Nike at Parthenon!

Athena at the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee - by  Geoff Stearns , used cropping pursuant to CC Attribution 2.0 Generic  License .

Athena at the Parthenon in Nashville, Tennessee - by Geoff Stearns, used cropping pursuant to CC Attribution 2.0 Generic License.

Temple of Athena Nike at Parthenon. Photo by  Luca Nicoletti  on  Unsplash

Temple of Athena Nike at Parthenon. Photo by Luca Nicoletti on Unsplash

(3) Femininity and Sensuality

Maybe it’s just the lack of sewn edges, or maybe depictions of Ancient Greco-Roman women just celebrates womanly, natural body shapes, but I think it’s awesome either way. The first ETL collection uses stretch to accommodate curves, and is designed for a shapely figure.

Ancient:

Image of Roman statute of Minerva by  rottonara  from Pixabay

Image of Roman statute of Minerva by rottonara from Pixabay

ETL: